Posted in Six word stories

Six Word Story: Superstition

My own entry in the new six word story challenge:


 

Knocked on wood. Turned out fake.

 

160309fake

 


 

The writing prompt for this week’s Six word story challenge is SUPERSTITION.

Superstition is the belief in supernatural causality—that one event causes another without any natural process linking the two events—such as astrology and certain aspects linked to religion, like omens, witchcraft and prophecies, that contradict natural science.

The challenge for you:

Write a story about SUPERSTITION in just six words. Let a photo or image inspire you to write a story. Or first write the story, and then make or search for a picture to go with it.

Here’s a Six Word Story by Ernest Hemingway.

SixWordStory

Such an impact and unseen images in only six words…

Publish your Six word story on your own website/blog and paste the link to that post in a comment to this one here at Figments. I will include your contribution in this post, forming a list of stories.

Will you join me? Will you? Say you do. And share the challenge news.

Have fun writing!
Marion

vulpen

READ THE STORIES ABOUT SUPERSTITION OF:

Who’s next? 🙂


 

  • The next challenge will be published on Wednesday, March 23. If you have an idea for a theme, please contactme.
  • Check out Six word story challenges for all themes. Perhaps you’ll find something you want to participate in.
  • Doe je liever mee in het Nederlands, kijk dan op Zes woorden uitdaging @ Doldriest.

 

6WSC

Author:

Blogger who loves her camera. No lady, but all woman. Caretaker of lads, cats, dungeons & dragons. DuTchess. V-man's biker witch.

5 thoughts on “Six Word Story: Superstition

  1. Another nice challenge, Marion!
    There is quite a story attached to my entry.
    https://peterbouchier.wordpress.com/english-essays-and-poems-2/english-essays-and-poems/ghost-ship/
    The picture (taken from internet) shows the figurehead of Cutty Sark, the old ship lying in Greenwich, London as part of the National Maritime Museum. It represents Nannie, the beautiful witch from Robert Burns’s epic poem Tam O’Shanter. In the story Tam has been out drinking and gets lost in the woods late at night. He comes across a church where a crowd of creeps attends a black sabbath service. Beautiful Nannie is dancing, dressed only in a night gown called a cutty sark in Burns’s dialect. When Tam roars out: “Weel done, cutty sark!” she flies towards him in fury, but in hot pursuit only gets hold of mare Maggie’s tail. As it tears off lucky Tam has a narrow escape.
    Suspicious crewmembers of the ship that was named after the witch used to put a spare rope in the figurehead’s outstretched hand, expecting the fake horse’s tail would give the ship some extra speed.
    Click the Dutch flag to check out the Dutch version of my entry.
    Do feel free to also read my Nannie Trilogy, a story featuring the ship, the figurehead, and pretty Nannie herself.
    https://peterbouchier.wordpress.com/english-essays-and-poems-2/english-essays-and-poems/nannie-trilogy/
    Greetings!
    Peter

    Liked by 1 person

    1. An intriguing story about superstition, Peter. Poor tailless Maggie, and beautiful Nannie with two tails. I do hope Maggie got over her disfiguration in time. Perhaps the tail grew back.
      Life aboard the Cutty Sark must have been bleak and frightful at times. I can imagine the sailors were superstitious.

      Liked by 1 person

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